Reviewing the natural history books of 2021 (so far)

Hello friends! It’s me again after another hiatus… to talk about some non fiction books I have been reading lately! I am not typically a non-fiction reader and find it much slower going than fiction but in a vague attempt at keeping to the sciency-theme of this blog I will go through some here. My …

Veganuary 2021: One year on

Wow, a whole year has passed since Veganuary 2020. And now I am here to write about Veganuary 2021. And let me tell you, what a difference 12 months makes – especially when those 12 have been spent predominantly in isolation. I started off last year’s post by explaining how bad at being vegetarian I …

The books that took me through 2020

Hi guys! I know that I haven’t put anything new up lately due to me moving and getting a full-time job, however I thought I would do a little roundup of some of the books I have read this year. I have picked ones which I have particularly enjoyed/ found interesting, but there are loads …

Yellowstone: Wolves as ecosystem engineers

The effects of the reintroduction of wolves in Yellowstone National Park, USA, have been widely studied – the prolonged absence and then reintroduction of wolves at the top of the food chain makes this case study a great natural experiment into ecosystem dynamics. This post will collate the interesting bits from the research, and look …

Extinction Rebellion and the Climate Emergency

(Okay, so technically this does not begin with X for my alphabet…. but it still counts when abbreviated to XR, right?!)… History suggests that governments will only take action if there is intense pressure to do so (Gunningham, 2019). In 2018, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned us that we have only 12 years …

Wangari Maathai: Building change by planting trees

Nobel prize winner, environmentalist, and professor Wangari Maathai created the “Green Belt Movement”, an initiative to prevent environmental degradation linked to commercial deforestation across Kenya. During the 1970s and onwards, colonial and post-colonial pressures forced Kenyan farmers to grow cash crops such as tea and coffee for the foreign market, rather than the traditional crops …

Viruses: how particles in our poo are making us sick

When human sewage gets into our water systems, it can have disastrous effects on health. The 1955-1956 outbreak of hepatitis in New Delhi due to contamination of the Jumna River was one of the first instances which led scientists to link human health with sewage contaminated water (Bosch, 1998). Since then, research has found over …

Urban greening: make our cities green again!

55% of the world’s population now live in urban areas – in Europe, that number soars to almost 75% (The World Bank, 2020). These cities can be extremely densely packed, making green spaces difficult to preserve, and even harder to squeeze into established areas (Haaland & van Den Bosch, 2015). When gardens, parks and fields …

News: Tiktok, tuna and the world’s largest bee

This post is just a brief one highlighting some of the top, positive, environmental news from September 2020. Enjoy. Tiktok Millennials (born between 1980 and 2000) and Generation Z (late 90s- 2010s) are becoming increasingly more aware of environmental issues by using the Internet, with one notable example being the video-sharing platform Tiktok. Many users …

Seasonal eating: what’s the point?

Today we are back with my most favourite topic: FOOD! This post is going to look at seasonal and local produce,  our perceptions of what is “seasonal” and whether eating with the seasons is better for the environment. Enjoy! Our supermarkets today allow us to purchase food products from all over the world. This incorporates …

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