The books that took me through 2020

Hi guys! I know that I haven’t put anything new up lately due to me moving and getting a full-time job, however I thought I would do a little roundup of some of the books I have read this year. I have picked ones which I have particularly enjoyed/ found interesting, but there are loads …

Seasonal eating: what’s the point?

Today we are back with my most favourite topic: FOOD! This post is going to look at seasonal and local produce,  our perceptions of what is “seasonal” and whether eating with the seasons is better for the environment. Enjoy! Our supermarkets today allow us to purchase food products from all over the world. This incorporates …

REDD+: How effective are carbon offsetting schemes?

How effective are REDD+ incentives for carbon offsetting? This post will take a look at the complex effects that paying for carbon in trees can have on the economy and the community.

Smart Shorts III: Can eating Quorn help you save the planet?

Have you ever sat down for dinner, started tucking into a Quorn lasagne, escalope or the best of the best (in my opinion) the Quorn nugget, and wondered to yourself… What is this? Well, I have! So to answer my own question (and hopefully satisfy your curiosity too), this blog post will cover what Quorn …

Which is the real problem: Overpopulation or Overconsumption?

In 2015, 141 million people were born – 44 million more than was recorded 65 years earlier (Ritchie, 2019).  Our current population stands at over 7 billion, and could reach 9 billion by 2050. This puts a lot of strain on our planet’s resources, and leads many to believe that with fewer mouths to feed, …

What has Boris got against newts?!

Last month (July 2020) the UK prime minister Boris Johnson said the following words: “Time is money. And the newt-counting delays in our system are a massive drag on the productivity and prosperity of this country.” …What’s that all about? What are newt-counting delays, and how are newts linked with societal productivity and prosperity? This …

Badger Culling

Badgers are charismatic, black-and-white striped mammals which share their scientific family with otters, weasels and ferrets, and are protected in the UK under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 (Bennett & Willis, 2008). They live in underground setts, some of which have been found to extend from 20-100m or more, with the largest in the …

Anthropocene

Today is the first day in what I am referring to as my “Alphabet”, which will feature an environmental/social issue for every letter (Z and Q remain a struggle so let me know if you have any ideas!) So, A is for Anthropocene. “Anthropocene” is the term used by many to describe the new geological …

Smart Shorts III: Foraging Frenzy

Foraging describes the harvest of non-cultivated “wild” goods, also known as non-timber forest products (NTFPs). Such goods may contain wild animals, fish and wild plants such as stinging nettles, wild garlic and wild mustard – the focus of this essay is on the latter. The practice, at least in people, is as old as the …

Air quality and exercise: should I be worried?

Introduction to air quality Anthropogenic activities are a major cause of air pollution. Whilst historically it was the actions of the industrial sector which led to major air pollution events (such as the famous Great Smog of London in 1952) in the Western world, today the transport sector plays an increasingly devastating role in making …

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